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Top Ten Tuesday: Books I should have DNF’d

Top Ten Tuesday: Books I should have DNF’d

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish, but was recently relocated to That Artsy Reader Girl.  I’m actually rebelling when it comes to this week’s topic, because I NEVER DNF books. Even if it’s 800 pages long and I’m absolutely hating it, I’ll […]

Review: All of This is True by Lygia Day Penaflor

Review: All of This is True by Lygia Day Penaflor

‘You see, you can be in love with a thing the way you can be in love with a person. A thing can trigger the same chemical responses as another human can: oxytocin and vasopressin. Fatima taught me this. Her book proved it.’ Hi there, […]

Top Ten Tuesday: Bookish worlds I’d never want to live in

Top Ten Tuesday: Bookish worlds I’d never want to live in

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish, but was recently relocated to That Artsy Reader Girl

I was torn while creating this list, because some of these bookish worlds would be awful to live in… But I’m still kind of tempted by them. I’m interested to know whether I could survive in a zombie apocalypse, or what personality type I’d be sorted into. I’d love to encounter aliens, but I’m not sure whether I’m into the ‘invasion’ part.

These ten books feature worlds I say I’d never want to live in… But probably would anyway.

10) The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

I haven’t read or watched The Hunger Games yet, but I know enough about it to say that I 100% definitely would not want to live in that world. Nope.

9) Twilight by Stephenie Meyer

Twilight by Stephenie Meyer

Because if vampires existed I wouldn’t want them to be sparkly. I’d start laughing at them, they’d take the opportunity to rip my throat out. I mean, I’d deserve it for laughing at them, but *shrug*

8) The 100 by Kass Morgan

The 100 by Kass Morgan

I’d be interested in living in the world of The 100, because it would be fascinating to see how much Earth changed with 100 years away from human interference… But I have a terrible immune system, so the likelihood is that it would affect my body terribly and I’d just drop dead. Unfortunate.

7) War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells

War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells

The descriptions of the aliens in this book haunt me. I read it way, way back in 2012, and I can still visualise them so powerfully. If I ever encountered one I’d just lay down and let it take me out, because there’s no way I’d try to fight it.

6) Snow Like Ashes by Sara Raasch

Snow Like Ashes by Sara Raasch

I’m a fan of the weather being warm, but not too hot, cool, but not too cold. Living in a world where you only ever got to experience one season? That would be my worst nightmare.

5) Red Rising by Pierce Brown

Red Rising by Pierce Brown

No matter how much I love Red Rising, I wouldn’t love to live in Darrow’s world. Having your worth judged on your physical stature isn’t the one, and although I like to think I’d be a Violet – part of the creative class – I’d hate to find out for sure.

4) The Host by Stephenie Meyer

The Host by Stephenie Meyer

This list is surprisingly alien oriented. Compared to War of the WorldsThe Host is a far less scary novel, but I think that the aliens are much worse. They’re implanted into you and take control of your body, leaving you conscious in the back of your mind but unable to do anything. Shudder.

3) Autumn by David Moody

Autumn by David Moody

Autumn is one of the less scary zombie worlds, but I still wouldn’t love to live in it. These are zombies that don’t act how you’d expect: they’re pretty placid and immobile to start with, but they quickly become ravenous monsters hellbent on ripping your face off. I’d hate to be lulled into a false sense of security just to have it turn around and bite me on the ass (literally!)

2) Divergent by Veronica Roth

Divergent by Veronica Roth

This trilogy is jam-packed with death and destruction. I know for a fact I’d be dead within a few pages, but I’d also love to know what I’d be sorted as. I’m not brave enough to be Dauntless, and although I’m nice I don’t know if I’m either kind or selfless enough to fit into Amity or Abnegation. Perhaps I’d be Divergent myself? Who knows.

1) The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey

The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey

I mean, some of the waves are horrible. Electromagnetic pulses, flooding, alien invasion… None of these sound as though they’re going to be a whale of a time. I think this is worse than War of the Worlds because those aliens are quite obviously ALIENS, whereas the aliens in The 5th Wave appear as humans, which is much more terrifying.

 

If you’re interested in purchasing any of these books, please consider using my Amazon Affiliate link (found in the book’s title). If you’d like to read more about each book, please click their cover: you’ll be redirected to their Goodreads page.

 

Would you love to live in any of these bookish worlds, or are you torn like me?

Alyce

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Top Ten Tuesday: Best character names

Top Ten Tuesday: Best character names

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish, but was recently relocated to That Artsy Reader Girl.  I have a really terrible memory, so this topic has been a nightmare. Some days I struggle to remember my name, so how am I supposed to […]

Alyce, where have you been?

Alyce, where have you been?

Hey guys! I’ve been MIA for the past couple of weeks, so I thought it was time to write an update and let you all know what’s been going on. You’ll probably remember that I had a baby towards the end of March. She is […]

Top Ten Tuesday: Books I hated but I’m glad I read

Top Ten Tuesday: Books I hated but I’m glad I read

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish, but was recently relocated to That Artsy Reader Girl

I’m sure we’ve all been there. You read a book and absolutely hate it, but you can’t keep telling people that you read it. It’s the only thing you can talk about. You’re obsessed.

This happens to me far more regularly than I’m willing to admit to. These ten books are ones that I hated but I’m really glad I read, because I feel like they make me a proper book blogger.

10) Me Being Me Is Exactly as Insane as You Being You by Todd Hasak-Lowy

Me Being Me is Exactly as Insane as You Being You by Todd Hasak-Lowy

I’m glad I read Me Being Me is Exactly as Insane as You Being You because the idea is so brilliant, and if I hadn’t read it I would still be wondering if it would become one of my favourite books of all time. The answer? No. A story told through lists is a cool idea, but the execution is dreadful (and the main character is a total ass).

9) The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton

The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton

I had wanted to read The Age of Innocence since watching an episode of Gossip Girl which paid homage to it. I’m not sure if it’s the way I read the book – through an app which sent me a chapter a day – or the story itself, but something about it was awful. It definitely gave me a deeper appreciation of Gossip Girl, though.

8) Flight to Eternity by J.R. Harrison

Flight to Eternity by J.R. Harrison

When I started working in the library, people could not stop talking about local author J.R. Harrison and his book, Flight To Eternity. It’s… Trippy. I’m glad I read it, because it means that there’s a real review of it available on Goodreads (it has three ratings: my 2 stars, and two accounts which the author created to give his novel two 5 star ratings) but my brain still hurts when I think about this book too closely.

7) There Will Be Lies by Nick Lake

There Will Be Lies by Nick Lake

I loved Whisper To Me, and although There Will Be Lies wasn’t exactly my cup of tea, I could appreciate the fact that Nick Lake featured a protagonist who was hard of hearing. It made the book a little disorienting because it constantly felt as though I was missing bits, but that’s a realistic portrayal of the experience of people who are hard of hearing. I’ve even recommended it to a couple of friends who are hard of hearing since, and they really enjoyed it.

6) Ferryman by Claire McFall

Ferryman by Claire McFall

Ferryman was the first book which I gave a bad review, so I’m grateful that I read this one because it tested how brutally honest I wanted my blog to be. It’s gone on to be one of my most popular posts of all time, so it’s proof that honesty pays off!

5) Ruin and Rising by Leigh Bardugo

Ruin and Rising by Leigh Bardugo

Shadow and Bone was one of the strongest series starters I’d ever read, and the story vastly improved during Siege and Storm. Sadly the third volume disappointed me, but I’m glad that I finished the series because I adored the first two.

4) Panther by David Owen

Panther by David Owen

Panther is one of the books which has disappointed me the most. I’d heard amazing things about it and was really excited to read a YA book which featured a male protagonist with an eating disorder, but I ended up hating Derrick because he’s a very creepy character. The eating disorder was handled sensitively, it was just the rest of Derrick’s personality that was problematic.

3) Girl Online by Zoella

Girl Online by Zoella

I only read Girl Online so that I could make an informed judgement regarding the ghostwriting drama and Zoe Sugg’s merits as an author. For some reason I decided to carry on reading the series and I enjoyed the third installment so much that I gave it 4 stars: if I hadn’t forced myself to plough through her first book, I wouldn’t have gotten the enjoyment that I did from the third.

2) The Fault in Our Stars by John Green

The Fault in Our Stars by John Green

Everyone should read The Fault in Our Stars, but it really does seem to be the YA community’s version of Marmite. It’s either someone’s favourite book of all time EVER or the worst book they’ve ever read which they’re tempted to throw in the bin. I’m firmly part of the latter camp: I genuinely think this wouldn’t have been published if it didn’t have John Green’s name on the cover.

1) The Fate of the Tearling by Erika Johansen

The Fate of the Tearling by Erika Johansen

The Fate of the Tearling is on this list for the same reason as Ruin and Rising. I hated The Queen of the Tearling and thought The Invasion of the Tearling was one of the best books I’d ever read, but the third installment was utterly disappointing. It feels as though Erika Johansen changed her mind halfway through writing the book and chickened out, which still really annoys me.

 

If you’re interested in purchasing any of these books, please consider using my Amazon Affiliate link (found in the book’s title). If you’d like to read more about each book, please click their cover: you’ll be redirected to their Goodreads page.

 

Are there any books which you hated but you’re glad you read anyway?

Alyce

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Review: Nowhere Else But Here by Rachel Cotton

Review: Nowhere Else But Here by Rachel Cotton

Hello, and welcome to my stop on the Nowhere Else But Here blog tour! First things first, I’d like to say a huge thanks to Ink Road for allowing me to get involved in the tour for this exciting contemporary debut from a very promising young author. […]

Top Ten Tuesday: Purple books

Top Ten Tuesday: Purple books

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish, but was recently relocated to That Artsy Reader Girl.    For this week’s Top Ten Tuesday, we have to showcase ten book covers which have our favourite colour on them. My favourite colour is undoubtedly purple, […]

Review: All The Crooked Saints by Maggie Stiefvater

Review: All The Crooked Saints by Maggie Stiefvater

‘We don’t quite understand miracles. This is the way of most divine things; saints and miracles belong to a different world and use a different set of rules.’ 

All The Crooked Saints doesn’t make a lick of sense.

The Soria family cause miracles. These miracles involve the darkness inside a person leaving their body and physically manifesting, so that the sufferer can figure out how to deal with it and dispel the darkness by themselves.

It takes a bloody long time to get your head around that, though, as Maggie Stiefvater employs so many convoluted metaphors on every dang page. Some people might interpret that as whimsical and inspiring, but in my opinion it was downright aggravating.

I’m not automatically opposed to magical realism, but I do think that there’s a right and a wrong way to go about it. Sadly, All The Crooked Saints falls into the latter camp. It’s difficult to find the words to describe how I felt about this book. I flew through it which is normally a sign that I’m really enjoying the writing/plot/characters, but just a couple of days after finishing it I’ve already forgotten basically everything that happened. It’s not a memorable book, and it’s hard to take anything in because it’s so hard to get your head around what’s happening.

Maggie Stiefvater has a dedicated fanbase who I’m sure adored this standalone release, but it wasn’t for me. If you’re not a fan of magical realism, avoid this book. If you enjoy fantasy and being mildly-to-extremely befuddled, give it a go.

 

If you’re interested in learning more about All The Crooked Saints, check it out on Goodreads. If you decide to buy a copy, please consider using my Amazon affiliate link: I’ll earn a few pennies from your purchase. Thank you!

 

Alyce

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Top Ten Tuesday: Books I’d slay a lion to get early

Top Ten Tuesday: Books I’d slay a lion to get early

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish, but was recently relocated to That Artsy Reader Girl.  One of the best parts of being a book blogger is having my finger on the pulse when it comes to book announcements. I get upcoming releases […]