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Top Ten Tuesday: Favourite bookish websites

Top Ten Tuesday: Favourite bookish websites

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish, but was recently relocated to That Artsy Reader Girl.    I’ll be honest, most of the bookish websites that I visit are blogs. That means this post is going to be a sprinkling of sites I […]

Blog tour: In Bloom by C.J. Skuse

Blog tour: In Bloom by C.J. Skuse

Hi there, and welcome to my stop on the In Bloom blog tour. This post contains spoilers for Sweetpea, so please look away if you haven’t read it yet! I only reviewed Sweetpea a couple of weeks ago, but I couldn’t resist taking part in this tour and getting to […]

Blog tour: Love the Stationery in Your Classroom by Rebecca Palliser

Blog tour: Love the Stationery in Your Classroom by Rebecca Palliser

Welcome to the first of two blog tours which I’m taking part in today.

The two titles couldn’t be much further apart – this is a book aimed at young school children, while I’m also on the blog tour for C.J. Skuse’s second adult crime novel, In Bloom. Check back in an hour or so to see that post!

But first up is Love the Stationery in Your Classroom by Rebecca Palliser, an adorable rhyme-filled picture book which teaches little ones how to respect the shared stationery at school so that everyone can have fun playing with it (and the stationery can feel happier, too!).

About the book:

Love the Stationery in Your Classroom by Rebecca Palliser

This delightful little book encourages children to learn about – and have fun with – the stationery they encounter in the classroom. Author Rebecca Palliser wants to help all children to find their feet in the primary school classroom.

After reading Love the Stationery in Your Classroom, I decided to give it 3 stars.

I wasn’t expecting it to be a rhyming story, so when I started reading it out to my daughter I was delighted. The story is simple but effective: the stationery in the classroom are fed up with being treated terribly by the children they’re there to help, so they write them a letter asking them to consider being more respectful.

All the best picture books have a moral and although teaching children to act responsibly isn’t a unique lesson, it’s delivered in a light-hearted and fun way that doesn’t make it sound like a boring lesson to learn.

My only complaint about Love the Stationery in Your Classroom is that I wish there had been more images. The pictures of the stationery are very whimsical, their happy faces at odds with the sadness that they’re feeling, and they’re very visually pleasing.

However, there are two rhymes on each page! If it had been separated so that each rhyme had its own separate page, it would have showcased the different types of stationery better. It also would make the book less daunting for a young child to read on their own, because the language isn’t very complex but having a lot of text on one page could be off-putting.

I’m definitely going to be keeping hold of this picture book to show to my daughter when she’s a little older and getting ready to go to school. She’s only a few months old and she loved the voices which I gave to all of the different characters – I’m sure she’ll enjoy it even more when she can appreciate the adorable artwork.

 

If you’re interested in learning more about Love the Stationery in Your Classroom, click on the cover to check it out on Goodreads. If you decide to buy a copy, please consider using my Amazon affiliate link: I’ll earn a few pennies from your purchase. Thank you!

 

About the author: Rebecca Palliser

Rebecca Palliser is a young primary school teacher whose experiences in the classroom inspired her to write to have an influence on her pupils.

 

She is about to embark on a Masters programme where she hopes to continue to write alongside her studies.

 

She takes inspiration for her stories from her travels exploring different cultures and cities, spending time with her little dog Darcy and of course her biggest muse, the delightful pupils she is fortunate to teach.

 

 

Last, but certainly not least, I’d like to say a huge thank you to Faye Rogers, for organising the blog tour for Love the Stationery in Your Classroom, and to Rebecca Palliser for writing such a cute story.

Alyce

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Review: My Box-Shaped Heart by Rachael Lucas

Review: My Box-Shaped Heart by Rachael Lucas

“I don’t really know what sort of person I am,” I say. “But I think it’s time to find out.”  Holly and Ed both use their local swimming pool as a way to escape from the things that are troubling them. Holly’s mum started hoarding […]

Review: Deaf Havana – Sound Knowledge Marlborough, 09/08/18

Review: Deaf Havana – Sound Knowledge Marlborough, 09/08/18

With the heatwave over and a cool breeze in the air, it was the perfect day for a family-friendly acoustic set. Taking place in the courtyard outside Sound Knowledge and Cafe Thirty8 at lunchtime, an eager group of fans were thanking their lucky stars for […]

Review: Batman: Nightwalker by Marie Lu

Review: Batman: Nightwalker by Marie Lu

“What’s the point of being a billionaire if I can’t have a little fun?”

I’ll be honest, I’m not a huge fan of Batman. In my opinion he’s not really a superhero, just a rich asshole. I only decided to read this book because I’d heard a lot of good things about Marie Lu’s writing but wasn’t sure I wanted to commit to reading a series (plus this book is super short, so if I didn’t gel with it I knew it wouldn’t take me long to get through it anyway).

What I wasn’t expecting was for Marie Lu to convert me into a Batman fan. Her Bruce Wayne has some of the stereotypical traits of the Batman we all know (and most people love); he’s a cocky billionaire with a taste for fast cars and justice. But Lu’s Bruce Wayne doesn’t stop there. He also has a softer side, vulnerable from losing his parents and reliant on Alfred, his guardian and the only parental figure he has left. He cares for his friends, Harvey and Dianne, and they even make him crack a few smiles – this Bruce Wayne isn’t moody and bleak, he actually has some hope and happiness in his life. And when he starts falling for Madeleine, an apprehended Nightwalker who’s more than just a cold-blooded killer, it even looks like he might have love…

Lu takes the source material and twists it, bending Bruce into her own character which still closely resembles the original. This is a book for those who love Batman, and those who have always thought that he could be a better character. I’ve always been disdainful towards him, but now I can’t help but think that there is more to him than meets the eye, which makes him a far more interesting character.

Not only that, but the plot and the storytelling are cinematic, and I found the scenes coming to life behind my eyes. I’m not a very visual reader, so when this does happen it takes me by surprise, but this book wouldn’t have been the same if Lu hadn’t described everything in such great detail. The fight scenes are well choreographed, and even though they’re playing out on the page the movements still sound realistic: there’s nothing that made me raise an eyebrow or seemed physically impossible. The plot does have a few overdone tropes, but what superhero movies don’t? It made the book seem even more ingrained in the DC universe.

I loved seeing familiar names pop up in the background, because it made me wonder what would happen in those character’s futures to take them to where we know they end up. We all know Harvey Dent as the villain Two-Face, so how does he get from being Bruce’s best friend to being a bad guy? It’s very fun to speculate. I did wonder whether Dianne was supposed to be Wonder Woman – it’s a similar name to Diana – but that didn’t get confirmed, so I’m left to ponder upon it.

If you like origin stories which add something, I highly recommend this book. Even if you’re not a Batfan, give this a go and I’m sure you’ll end up feeling more affectionate towards him by the end.

 

If you’re interested in learning more about Batman: Nightwalker, check it out on Goodreads. If you decide to buy a copy, please consider using my Amazon affiliate link: I’ll earn a few pennies from your purchase. Thank you!

 

Have you read any of the DC Icons books? If so, which has been your favourite so far?

Alyce

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Top Ten Tuesday: Books I’d mash together

Top Ten Tuesday: Books I’d mash together

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish, but was recently relocated to That Artsy Reader Girl.  I’ve found this topic really, really hard. I’m not the most creative person, so trying to visualise a world in which two of my favourite books collide […]

Review: The Language of Thorns by Leigh Bardugo

Review: The Language of Thorns by Leigh Bardugo

I’ve been resisting picking up The Language of Thorns since it was released, as I haven’t yet read the Six of Crows duology and was worried about getting spoilers. For anyone who has been avoiding it for the same reason, fear no more! The Language of Thorns might be part of […]

Review: Perfect by Cecelia Ahern

Review: Perfect by Cecelia Ahern

I wasn’t the biggest fan of Flawed, the first novel in Cecelia Ahern’s young adult duology. I’ll be honest, I hadn’t exactly planned to carry on with the series, but I love closure so I couldn’t resist borrowing it when I spotted it on the library eBook list.

It’s been two years since I started this duology, so I’m sure you’re not surprised to know that I’d forgotten a LOT about what went down. We join Celestine hiding out at her grandfather’s farm, evading the Whistleblowers employed to monitor her since she was branded Flawed – a member of society treated as an outcast for a mistake that they made.

Celestine’s mistake? Trying to save the life of a Flawed man.

It took me a little while to get back into the story. Celestine is not at her grandfather’s farm for long, with the majority of the novel stuffed with almost captures which are slyly evaded or actual captures which are quickly escaped. The problem with this is that it gets repetitive quickly, and when you look back from the end of the novel you realise that nothing of note happens.

In fact, there was no need for a sequel. In the first installment, Judge Crevan brands Celestine on her spine. This is filmed by her lawyer, and the footage promises to take down Judge Crevan and the Guild that he represents. One of the biggest problems I had with the first book was that it felt too long and needed cutting down, and I have exactly the same issue with this installment. The events of the Flawed duology could have easily fitted into a standalone, and I can’t really understand why it was split (apart from the obvious reason of making more money). The plot that begins in book one is successfully wrapped up in book two, but other than some hurdles which are easily overcome nothing else gets in Celestine’s way. There isn’t even much in the way of subplot (apart from an almost love triangle, which doesn’t go anywhere).

I was aggravated when Ahern implied that anti-vaxxers being branded Flawed was inappropriate, as I think that’s a naive viewpoint and an inappropriate one to nurture in young readers, but it was only a very brief mention and didn’t impact the greater plot. I also thought it was irritating when Carrick and Celestine slept together and the scene faded to black – not the most responsible way of portraying a young girl losing her virginity. It would have been the perfect place to squeeze in a brief discussion of contraception and the nature of being completely ready, but instead it was brushed over and dealt with in an immature way.

I gave Flawed a two star rating because it annoyed the bejeebus out of me, but I couldn’t justify rating Perfect higher or lower than three stars. It’s completely bland, failing to provoke an extreme reaction of love or hate. Yes, those two aspects annoyed me (and, now I’m dwelling on them, I’m wondering whether I should have dropped my rating down to two stars) but the majority of the novel is so uneventful that it’s difficult to find the energy to care about it.

I’m yet to read any of Cecelia Ahern’s adult novels, but this hasn’t made me feel inclined to do so.

 

If you’re interested in learning more about Perfect, check it out on Goodreads. If you decide to buy a copy, please consider using my Amazon affiliate link: I’ll earn a few pennies from your purchase. Thank you!

 

Have you read the Flawed duology? If so, what did you think of it?

Alyce

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Review: Sweetpea by C.J. Skuse

Review: Sweetpea by C.J. Skuse

If you were asked to describe a serial killer, you probably wouldn’t describe Rhiannon. That’s how she keeps managing to get away with murder. We meet Rhiannon on New Year’s Eve, mere hours before she chops a guy’s penis off for sexually propositioning her. That’s […]